Monthly Archives: December 2017

Who is the “Typical” Entrepreneur? What are the Typical Characteristics?

Who is the “Typical” Entrepreneur? What are the Typical Characteristics?

They are usually highly creative;  have visionary ideas; they are also daring decision makers and like to take risks.

They seek independence and freedom. Does this sound like you?

Joe Sugarman says that a true entrepreneur is a person who makes a lot of money, loses it all and makes it all back again. He reveals some more traits of the “typical” entrepreneur in this video, filmed at the Titanium Mastermind in Los Cabos, Mexico.

 

Who is the “Typical” Entrepreneur? What are the Typical Characteristics

THE TYPICAL ENTREPRENEUR

Entrepreneurs are not infallible. They have some flaws as well.

They tend to bristle under authoritarian figures and they have a moderate need for power and to be the one in control.

Indeed they may come up with great imaginative ideas, but sometimes they have trouble letting these ideas go. Sometimes they are rigid, stubborn and resist change.

And they are not always the best managers, either. Often they are dominating and can be difficult to work with. Other times, they are too wrapped up in their own projects to be worrying about others.

THERE ARE NO EXCUSES

A study found that the average entrepreneur is a male between ages 30 and 35. But this is changing.

With the internet, anyone can be an entrepreneur. You can be any race, color, creed, nationality, gender and age. With the internet, there are no excuses.

You can access more beginner business strategies like this one, and learn how to model the “thinking patterns” of the world’s most successful business owners and entrepreneurs, in the MOBE Silver Masterclass. To learn more about the Silver Masterclass, click HERE.

 

Michael E Thornley
Author & Entrepreneur
www.michaelthornley.org

 

Reactive Mode or Productive Mode with the Michael Thornley Organisation

Reactive Mode or Productive Mode

Reactive Mode or Productive Mode. Sharing some great advice from my business partner and mentor Matt Lloyd

 

“One of the marks of successful people is they are action oriented. One of the marks of average people is they are talk oriented.”

~ Brian Tracy

Hey,

I’ll give you a quick productivity tip for today.

There’s 2 modes you can be in throughout your day when you’re working on your business.

You can be in reactive mode Or productive mode.

Reactive mode means you’re constantly consuming information, and then responding to it.  It could be emails.  Messages on Facebook or Instagram.  Skype.  A Youtube video. The information could be from staff.  Or from other marketers, trying to get you to buy their stuff.

There’s always going to be a portion of your day devoted to reactive tasks.  You can’t build a big business without giving your attention to new information and responding to it.

But, most people struggling to get their business off the ground are spending waaayyy too much time on reactive tasks.

The ones making no money are usually spending over 95% of their time just reacting.

On the other hand, the top 5% of revenue producing business’s in any industry are being run by people who flip those numbers on their head. They are spending 95% of their time creating new material.

New products with New roles to fill. Many New processes.  New ads and New sales copy.  Also New email marketing and follow-up videos.  New company’s. They are producers.  That’s why they get paid the big bucks.

Most of the time, I myself am a producer.

However, when I started out in business, that was not the case. Pre-2008, I’d spent more than the last decade in the education system getting taught to study and remember new information… not necessarily to apply that information.

I naturally spent all my time reading emails, watching videos, reading books and magazines, and watching from the sidelines what everyone else was doing.

I’d justify this obsessive consumption of other people’s material as important ‘learning time’ – but the truth is, I’d not yet learned the most important lesson for a new entrepreneur.

And that lesson is:

There’s absolutely no substitute for trying a lot of different things, having most of it fail, but learning through direct experience the few things which actually work.

It took me the better part of 2 years to really grasp this lesson.  Finally it got to a point where I was so sick to death of not making money, and not having a successful business, that I started to focus more on producing.

And so I started doing more videos.  I started doing more webinars.  And I started actually promoting and selling every single day.

I stopped consuming everyone else’s material, and started creating my own.

The sooner you experience this epiphany for yourself, the better.

Talk soon!

Matt Lloyd  CEO MOBE